Driving in Norway

A landscape as wondrous as Norway’s is arguably best enjoyed in your own time and at a leisurely pace, which has lead to many tourists renting their own vehicle upon arrival. Self-drive vacations are becoming increasingly popular with confident, outdoorsy travellers, and driving solo is definitely a unique way to explore one of the world’s most beautiful countries. Having said that, there are certainly a few things you should bear in mind before you take to the road in Norway. Here are the most important…

1. Toll Roads

Norway has a large number of Toll roads, and it’s important to make sure you are aware of how you can pay before you arrive. Most visitors opt for the most convenient method, registering beforehand with a credit card which bills you automatically as you pass through. This is advised as most of the Toll stations are unmanned and automatic, and while you can normally pay at the nearest petrol station as well, this isn’t always possible in the more remote areas. It’s best to register unless you want to come home to a big bill on the doormat…    

2. Road Closures

As you would expect for a country where the temperature dips well below freezing during the winter months, certain roads are closed at this time of year. Plan ahead to avoid unnecessary disappointment.

3. Mountain passes

Depending on where you are from, you may not have much experience driving through mountain passes similar to those that are found throughout Norway. There are often long downhill stretches, so be sure to drive in a low gear to avoid overheating your breaks, especially if you are driving a rented car!  

4. Speed limits

The national speed limit for cars on most Norwegian roads is 80 kilometres per hour, although in residential areas and built up towns it is significantly lower. Keep an eye out for speed control bumps, which often aren’t signposted.

3. Drinking and driving

As with most European countries, driving whilst under the influence of alcohol is strictly forbidden, and the local police have no issue with enforcing serious punishments. Respect your pristine surrounds and fellow driver; don’t do it.

It’s also illegal to use a mobile phone whilst on the road.

4. Visibility vests

Don’t get caught out. In Norway it is compulsory to have at least one visibility vest in your car at all times. If you’re renting, make sure you are provided with one.

5. Tyres

As you would expect, some of Norway’s rugged scenery requires decent tyres. If you’re renting, make sure that you have a minimum of 1.6 millimetres of tread on summer tyres and a minimum of 3 millimetres on winter tyres. As well as this, during the winter months it’s often necessary to use specialist winter tyres with studs, so plan ahead and come prepared.

 

Real Time Analytics